PhD studentship in algorithms/theory available again!

Funded PhD studentship in algorithms/theory at https://goo.gl/BfH7uP

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A PhD studentship similar in description to the one advertised earlier is available. The application deadline is rather short: July 3rd! Details and an application link are available at http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BCG461/phd-studentship-graph-algorithms-and-foundations-for-networks-of-the-future/

We seek candidates with strong interest in and willing to explore topics from, but not restricted to the following:  i) Graph algorithms and theory, ii) Self-healing, byzantine and other forms of resilient algorithms, iii) Compact routing and memory limited algorithms, iv) Static and dynamic Leader election and consensus, v) Connections between distributed algorithms and research areas such as parameterised complexity, topology, combinatorics, communication complexity, spectral, algebraic tools, vi) Algorithmic game theory and decision making, vi) Modelling and application to modern networks such as IOT and SDN.

The successful candidate will work closely with active research groups centred around both CS theory and networks. In particular, the candidate can benefit from interaction with upcoming research on compact self-healing routing algorithms supported by EPSRC (EPSRC research grant EP/P021247/1).

Driving BCTCS 2016

The 32nd British Colloquium of Theoretical Computer Science (BCTCS 2016) was held in Belfast from March 22nd to 24th at Belfast (QUB). Here are some insights, pictures and links to some talks.

The  32nd British Colloquium of Theoretical Computer Science (BCTCS 2016)  was held in Belfast from March 22nd to 24th at the pictueresque setting of Queen’s University Belfast and the newly remodelled Graduate School. It was a good amount of work – a bit like a 200 mts race where you accelerate rapidly and take a while to stop! This was more so because my colleague Alan Stewart who brought the conference here promptly retired leaving me in-charge! (Though he still did much of the work even post-retirement 🙂

I did my PhD in the USA in the area of algorithms and I discover that the areas of focus in theoretical Computer Science differ markedly in the US and UK. The UK has traditional strength in Languages and Logic whereas in the US there seems to be more strength in Algorithms based theory (this is something that the EPSRC readily admit!). BCTCS had good representation across the themes particularly since some of our speakers were from across the pond(s) (including Iceland!).

Slides from some of the talks are available at http://www.amitabhtrehan.net/bctcs.html

 

 

Hope you have a look and find them interesting!